Great Ways to Use It for Growth

Unless you’ve aggressively saved money to bootstrap your business, you’ll likely need to borrow money at some point to make ends meet, whether it’s a formal loan through a bank or online lender or an informal one from family and friends.

Regardless of the amount or source of your loan, it can be tempting to make those big “nice to have” purchases when the money hits your bank account. However, it’s important to plan your spending carefully and allocate borrowed funds toward expenses that will ultimately accelerate your business’s growth.

We spoke with small business lending experts about smart ways to put business capital to work.

1. Equipment and operational costs
When you’re just starting out, you may not necessarily have the funds for all the basic elements your business needs to function. Jay DesMarteau, head of commercial bank specialty segments at TD Bank, said early-stage businesses will often use their funds for operational necessities such as buying inventory and building products.

“We are also seeing higher demand for lines of credit, which typically are used to finance short-term needs, such as buying or leasing equipment, purchasing a company vehicle or injecting cash into the business during a lean period, especially seasonal businesses,” DesMarteau added.

2. Payroll and hiring
A company is only as strong as the people behind it, and investing your new loan funds in hiring can be a great way to help your business grow.

“True growth means spending funds to add employees who can take over some tasks such as bookkeeping or ordering supplies and help support the daily functions,” said DesMarteau. “This will allow the business owner to better focus on long-term strategy and driving profitable revenue growth.”

Isaac Rodriguez, CEO of Provident Loan Society, notes that as a not-for-profit collateral lender, most of his organization’s loans are made for short-term expenses such as meeting payroll.

3. Soft costs
“Soft” costs, as opposed to “hard” physical assets or products, are those expenses that don’t directly help create a product or provide a service but are necessary to keep your business functioning. This includes things like licenses, marketing campaigns and professional fees, said Rodriguez. This could also cover fees for advisors like CPAs, attorneys and bankers.

“Maximize the use of capital,” Rodriguez told Business News Daily. “For example, don’t just pay legal fees and get tax returns done – explore how those professionals can help grow your business through referrals, recommendations, introductions, etc.”

4. Technology
From mom and pop shops to software startups, technology plays an integral role for most modern businesses. Even businesses that aren’t focused on a tech product may still need to invest in hardware and software to make their daily operations more efficient.

David Reiling, CEO of Minnesota-based Sunrise Banks, confirmed this trend, noting that many of the bank’s small business customers now use their borrowed capital for technology purchases.

“Traditionally, businesses come to us when they need to expand, whether they have outgrown their space, are increasing their production capabilities, or [are] adding staff,” Reiling told Business News Daily. “Recently, there has been a change, with a large number of businesses investing in their technology infrastructure to keep pace with growing digitalization.”